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Author Topic: Can you breed shrimp in a mixed shrimp tank??  (Read 4997 times)
turtletoes
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« on: January 26, 2008, 03:57:56 PM »

Ok, so now I have dived head 1st into shrimp Smiley I'd like to breed them to feed to my fish or to sell to local shops since they seem to have a hard time actually getting them in. Thats why I bought all that I could yesterday as soon as they were in, cuz its taken so long to finally get them, but dont know a few things..........

I have about 12 ghost shrimp. I have read that they need brackish water in order for the larval stage to grow into shrimp. Anyone successfully raised ghost shrimp?? Any tips??

I also got about 6 bee shrimp. I'd like them to multiply too. Any suggestions??

I also have I think 4 cherry shrimp. Any suggestions on breeding them??

I also got a few amano shrimp. I already had some of them in my large rainbowfish tank, but they have to hide out from the fish all the time. I think I got 4 more of them. I'd like them to multiply too...............any suggestions??

And lastly----can I breed all these guys in one tank, or do I need to split them up?? Will the other species of shrimp eat the babies of the other species??

Thanks
~Lori
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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2008, 07:42:52 PM »

OK.  Yes, shrimp may breed in a mixed tank.  And No, shrimp should not be bred in a mixed tank.  Certainly not in that mixture.  First the ghosts will eat all of the baby shrimp, so it will be no problem, but highly un-productive.  Then they will annoy and out compete the smaller shrimp for food.

If you really want to breed shrimp, set a species tank.  Even better, set a species tank of Red Cherries.  You will have many, many Red Cherry shrimp so long as you have at least one male and at least one female.  I know this for a fact, as I thought that I had lost my colony to some rainbowfish fry that stayed in the tank too long and decimated and more the RC colony.  When I rebuilt the tank for other use I found one adult male, one adult female, and one too-young-to-tell.  I now have dozens and dozens, but will add more to boost the diversity of the gene pool a bit.

Amanos are very difficult as the babies have a planktonic larval stage requiring BW/SW.  It can be done, but not the shrimp for first trials.

Ghost Shrimp may be fairly straightforward, not are not the easiest - they can be cannibalistic, and for me it best to move a berried female to a heavily planted tank to deliver and then move her back out.  If you have the right Ghost - there are multiple shrimp sold under that label, the planktonic phase is very short and undemanding - there will be enough infusoria in a planted but unstocked tank to get some babies out of the deal, and they will not require BW/SW.  But some shrimp sold as ghgost do have that requirement, so that handling will fail.

Bumblebees are like Red Cherries, fairly easy, but not nearly as prolific for me as the RCs.

Planted tanks, very good water quality, light feeding, and decent GH & KH are about all the esay shrimp require - along with freedom from strangers. 

HTH
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turtletoes
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« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2008, 09:21:19 PM »

Thanks again RTR.

Lots of great info. I plan to split up the different shrimp. Guess I may skip trying to breed the amanos for now. The ghost shrimp are a mixture it seems of different species or are hybrids--if thats possible?? They all seem to have some sort of coloration to them, but I havent spent the time to go thru and see which one looks like which species. One of the cherry shrimp is egg laden as I type. Guess I better put her in a safe house until she's done holding them. How long does it usually take to the cherry shrimp to carry their eggs?? What type of filtration do you use on your shrimp set up?? Or is it still part of the FW ref we were talking about?? BTW, I'll post a couple more questions on that topic on the other thread.

Thanks again
~Lori
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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2008, 12:23:38 AM »

There are several species more or less properly called Ghost shrimp (meaning only cheap, easy to harvest in mass during season, pond-held to semi-farm or warehouse for year-round marketing mostly clear smallish shrimp), plus various contaminants of other species - I have gotten several Macrobrachium shrimp as contaminanats in batches of feeder Ghost shrimp - you do not want those and very few are FW breedable.

My filters are the ones that started life as Tetra Brilliant or Billi filters, but Tetra sold the design after the company changed hands - they are now available from Hagen:

http://www.marinedepot.com/ps_AquariumPage~PageAlias~filters_hagen_foam.html

Check around for prices, that was just early in a Google search for pictures...

I have literally boxes of them - ultimate fry/shrimp/small QT/versatile filters.  They last forever.
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turtletoes
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« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2008, 03:16:25 AM »

Cool, thats exactly what I just ordered!! Smiley They ranged in price from $3.99 to like $8.99 on Drs Foster and Smith--they were having a sale---. They should be here in a couple days. I got a few different sizes for various things including the shrimp tank. I figured if rainbow fry can be grown up using those filters, that shrimp would be ok with them too. Smiley
Thanks
~Lori
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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #5 on: January 27, 2008, 11:41:57 AM »

Another equipment note and a shameless but unfortunately unpaid ad for one product.  If you use air-driven filters regularly and consistently, when you need to replace your air pump at least take a deep breath and consider the Coralife Luft air pump*.  These also last forever and are as close to silent as a vibrator pump can be.  Mine are hanging from L-hooks in the studs of the tank room walls, and are effectively silenced.  I still have some in operation from the old house, over 20 years ago.  It is one of those terrible things where you do get what what you pay for - expensive, but effective and remarkably lasting.

*This unit also was originally made by Tetra, just as the good sponge filters were.  It is hard to believe today I know, but once Tetra was among the very best brands in the hobby, with Dupla and Eheim.  But the original family sold out, and the handwriting was on the wall when the new owners sold off the rights and designs to two of the best and most reliable products they had.  At least the new companies making these units are apparently maintaining the old and high quality of them.
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