Badman's Tropical Fish Forum

September 16, 2019, 10:30:36 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or join our community.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Welcome to the forum! Whether you are an old pro or new to the hobby, feel welcome to share your knowledge and experience and to further educate yourself about this great pastime of ours.

PetSmart
News: Stay tuned for another contest starting soon. 
 
   forum   guidelines calendar Forum search help Join Login  
  Main Site site map Fish Profiles Fish Stats Articles tank log Species Gallery Photo Gallery  

Badman's Chat
Users in chat
Please upgrade your brower.
in   cm  L °F   °C   click for tank volume calculations
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Diamond Tetras  (Read 4297 times)
fishbuddy
Guest
« on: February 07, 2008, 06:29:32 PM »

Would I have too many Diamond Tetras if I had a total of 12 in my 29 gallon tank? I also have 7 albino (dwarf) cories, a BN pleco, and a siames algea eater. I currently have 7 Diamond tetras, and everyone is happy. I have been thinking of upping my diamond population to 10, but thought 12 might be too many. (but a dream come true!) I saw MRM's comment on another thread, and thought I might ask for clarification.
Logged
Kim
pita sandwhich
Local Moderator
Full Member
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Tanks: 125,75,50,20's (2),10's(4),5's(7)
Posts: 8,718



« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2008, 07:18:04 PM »

I keep diamonds in a 75 & a 125. A 29 strikes me as a smallish tank for several fully grown specimans. They aren't super fast growers but they're an easy 2" fully grown and maybe a little more for some males. It's a high bodied fish as well with long finnage.
I would say 7 in a 29 is more then enough.  How many males do you have?  I had friends who experienced this fish as a nasty fin nipper. My own observation is that males can be hard on each other due to territorial issues. I think my friends  were overcrowding the males.  In my 75, my original two males sparred,not violently, but one always had ragged fins. I separated them eventually and 4 more young males matured. So far they are okay but I predict trouble as the young males get larger.
These fish breed easily in heavily planted tanks so I'm actually going to have to thin them out very hard.

I think your stocking is maxed out, honestly the Siamese algae eater may very well stunt in that set up. They should grow to a very stout 5" fish within a couple of years and they stunt easily.

I think your real dream come true would be a 55 gallon.  Smiley
« Last Edit: February 07, 2008, 07:29:11 PM by Kim » Logged

fishbuddy
Guest
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2008, 08:43:30 PM »

Hmm. Well. Duly noted. True, I have probably underestimated little Freddie's impact (the SAE) in the tank, and I should have my eye on him down the road as a possible return if he seems to be outgrowing the tank. A 55 sounds nice....

By the way, does anyone else out there actually keep Diamond Tetras? I think they're super, but even on this site there doesn't seem to be very much information on them. I have not experienced them as aggressive at all, but maybe I just have the right mix, and I don't even know it. They're peaceful, but not too wimpy - my LFS guy even said if they were in with my betta (I would never do that!) that The Diamonds would beat up the Betta, not the other way around. I think there's more to know about these guys than I realize.
Logged
RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
Full Member

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2,864



« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2008, 11:50:45 PM »

If you can arrange a side light or a diagonal light from the top front of the tank they really look spectacular.  They really need something more than top-down light to show up best IME.  It has been several years since I kept them, but I do remember that like the rainbows, Congo tetras,  and other fish with iridescence, light angle matters.
Logged

"Where's the fish?" - Neptune
Kim
pita sandwhich
Local Moderator
Full Member
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Tanks: 125,75,50,20's (2),10's(4),5's(7)
Posts: 8,718



« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2008, 01:57:25 AM »

yes, they certainly do look better in certain light, mine that are in the heavily planted tank stand out a lot more then the ones in the lightly planted. They also get much more spangly as they get older, especially the males.

fb maybe you only have one male? I have never noticed the females having issues, with each other or the males, but with plenty of females there shouldn't be problems.
Males are very territorial, I've noticed it particularly with the larger dominant male in my 125. He has chosen his spawning spot and stays busy chasing all other fish away from it, every so often he "captures" a female and drives her into his spot. It's very deliberate and obvious behavior. The smaller male in that group doesn't really have any problems with him because they don't have space issues in that size of tank, I have noticed though that he doesn't have a territory or appear to do any spawning.

When the two older males in my 75 were together as I said before, I saw them spar and chase each other a lot. Right now, even though there are 4 or 5 younger males in the 75, along with one of the original older males, there doesnt' appear to be a problem as yet. I don't know if it has to do with a "spreading of aggression" being that there are so many of them or if it's just a case of males being slow to sexually mature. I probably won't find out because I'm planning to get rid of all adults in both tanks in the next couple of months, I have a whole school of youngsters to raise up.
I blame Ed's food for that, before I started feeding that I would only get 2-3 youngsters at a time growing up, this time I have 7 of them!

Heather use to keep diamond tetra's I think, I don't know of anyone else here who does. Surprising because they're really nice fish for a larger tank.

Mine have never bothered other fish, just each other and just males but again, they are in larger tanks that aren't especially overcrowded.
Logged

RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
Full Member

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2,864



« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2008, 12:37:52 PM »

Kim - I think you hit the big reason for their lack of popularity in general.  I used a 40-long species tank, well planted.  It was a bit nippy at maturity, even though it was 4' long.  Quite a few of the "smaller" Tetras are not fish for small tanks.  Folks with large tanks tend to want larger fish.  Fish like the Diamonds fall in between, so get left out.  People who try them in 20s find then potential trouble-makers.  But blackskirts are about the same for me, and folks do like and keep them, so there are other factors.
Logged

"Where's the fish?" - Neptune
Kim
pita sandwhich
Local Moderator
Full Member
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Tanks: 125,75,50,20's (2),10's(4),5's(7)
Posts: 8,718



« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2008, 01:38:54 PM »

also maybe because they don't look so hot in store tanks and as juveniles, so lfs's don't carry them.

If I end up sending any to the lfs I'll send adults just for that reason. But I think I may be able to avoid that, I may have found homes for them. Smiley
Logged

fishbuddy
Guest
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2008, 07:06:31 PM »

Kim, I certainly do have more than one male. I have 3 definite males, and 3 definite females, and one I really can't figure out. It's fins are neatly halfway between all the others. Anyway, they're all pretty.

One thing I did read about diamonds early on in my research is that they really require a minimum school slightly larger than the average of six.  Something I read said 8-10 keeps them happiest (I wish I could reference this better.) I wonder if smaller groups lend themselves to more squabbling? I had a group of 9 initially, but lost 2 of them, 2-3 months ago, to fungus I think. My group of 7 is still healthy, and always peaceful. Sometimes they just "hang" in the tank, kind of drifting in different parts, or organizing smaller groups as they enter each others' territory. Sometimes they "call a meeting" as I call it, and school a while back and forth, just to establish order again (I think). I believe they have a pecking order of some sort, one of the males is in charge, but I keep losing track of which one it is.

They also have no competition with any other species for the main body of the water, unless you count the cories, who they seem very willing to ignore. The SAE draws no special attention either.
Logged
Kim
pita sandwhich
Local Moderator
Full Member
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Tanks: 125,75,50,20's (2),10's(4),5's(7)
Posts: 8,718



« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2008, 07:45:10 PM »

Quote
I wonder if smaller groups lend themselves to more squabbling?

That's probably it, maybe that's why I'm not having a problem with the present group in the 75 in spite of all the males. My original group was two males and 5 females.

Glad they're doing well, clearly you're very attentive to them.  I'm still going to encourage you to keep thinking about that 55.   Wink

I'm going to miss mine, they are so darn pretty and I hate sending fish away. At least a member here is going to take one group for me, that makes me feel better. Smiley
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Badman's Recommended Links
1 Post
1 Topic
Last post by Badman
in Sites We Support
on 5/2/07 12:00 PM

 

Navigation
Badman's

Main Site Navigation

Complete Map

 

 

 

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.05 seconds with 20 queries.