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Author Topic: Elephant nose  (Read 2340 times)
tetra7853
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« on: February 12, 2008, 11:27:33 PM »

I recently started a 20 gallon (tall) community tank.  After cycling it appropriately, and adding 3 red tetras, 2 black tetras, and two dwarf gourami, I decided to get an elephant nose.  My pet store mentioned that they should be kept solely or in more than three, but didn't mention anything about tank size.  Recently, I have read that they should be kept in larger than 30 gallons.  Should this be a problem (I do have lots of plants and rocks)?  It seems to be doing okay so far.  My only other concern is, that it never comes to the top to feed on the blood worms (my other fish eat too fast)...I have to put the food in his little cave, even if I try feeding it in the dark.  Any ideas of how to feed it without sticking my arm in the tank?  I am new at this, and would appreciate any advice.  Thanks 
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Taylor
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« Reply #1 on: February 12, 2008, 11:30:49 PM »

It needs at least a 55 gallon to itself, 75 being preferable. They are nearly blind, and are nocturnal.

http://www.badmanstropicalfish.com/profiles/profile42.html

To put it simply, that tank is too small, and the fish will die shortly.
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« Reply #2 on: February 13, 2008, 04:43:07 AM »

Tetra read the profile I'm attaching.
The fish is meant to grow to 13", that's more then half the length of your tank. If it did grow that large it wouldn't be much room to move around would it?
On the other hand, in a tank that small it likely will not grow to size, it will stunt, which is unhealthy and will cause the fish to have a much shortened life span.

This species will not do well in a 20g tank.

http://badmanstropicalfish.com/profiles/profile42.html
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Karen
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« Reply #3 on: February 13, 2008, 06:28:07 AM »

You are looking at a hand full of issues here.  They are an electric fish, and need space to send out and receive signals electrically.  Having multiples of them in the tank would be a BIG no no.  They would literally jam each others frequencies.  They live in really murky waters and do best in subdued lighting.

You really should get a few more tetras too, they are a schooling fish and need to be in groups of 5-6 of their own species. I have never kept your species of tetra and don't know how big they get, so assuming they have proper space in a 20 gallon the school size should get beefed up a bit. 

I would really encourage the bigger tank and a few more tetras!
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« Reply #4 on: February 13, 2008, 06:29:52 AM »

I must implore you to rehouse it in a 55g tank as soon as possible, or return it. Keeping it in a 20g is not healthy for it.

They also need something to hide under that covers the entire length of its body.

I feed my Elephantnose frozen blood worms and daphnia. After the second day it came up to eat from my fingers at the surface, after lights-out. Mine loves fresh insect larvae too, like mosquito.
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