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Author Topic: Verifying shrimp/iodine myth  (Read 11194 times)
TTran
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« on: April 26, 2008, 12:48:23 PM »

Is it true that we don't need to add iodine to our tanks if we have fertilizers and that adding too much iodine will cause the shrimp to molt more, which can be harmful for them?
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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2008, 06:14:16 PM »

Is it true that we don't need to add iodine to our tanks if we have fertilizers...

First, you do not ever add iodine to a tank, as it is toxic,  Just as you do not add chlorine to a tank, it is also toxic.  Iodide however is not necessarily toxic, just as chloride is not necessarily toxic and may be required commonly.

I am not at all sure that is a myth.  With at least two particular shrimps from two different genera, I have difficulty with molt death in unsupplemented tanks.  When I add reef iodide (not iodine), i no longer have molt issues.  On the other hand, I keep several other genera/species of shrimp quite well without supplemental iodide.

I am not sure what fertilizer have to do with iodide.  None of the ferts/supplements I use contain iodide.  Where did that come from and why?

...and that adding too much iodine will cause the shrimp to molt more, which can be harmful for them?

There is a highly significant difference between a material being required for a biological process (as iodide for molting in crustaceans) and a material driving a biological process (as thyroid homone for BMR)   I know that some iodide is required for the molt process.  I have never heard that it drives it.  Crustaceans must molt to be able to grow or breed, ergo require some iodide.  I have never heard or read anything saying that iodide drives molting beyond that which is required for growth.  I would love to know where that came from - do you have a reference?  I will be interested and happy to review it.

Overall I think what you stated sound more  like mythology itself than it does like having any real bearing on the requirement or lack thereof for iodide in mammals and fish and crustaceans - all of which have a requirement for iodide.  In the USA there are wide areas with insufficient iodide in the soils to me human needs, so the government requires table salt to be iodized to compensate.  If you live in such an area, you may need to add iodide for certain fish and for certain crustaceans.  If there is enough trace iodide in your water supply naturally, you may not need to supplement.



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« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2008, 09:35:38 PM »

TTran, that type of highly confusing information is all over the web. I understand why you are confused. I have read more than I care to admit about what shrimp need or don't need.

For me personally I do not use it and never have. I have never had shrimp deaths due to molting problems. But if I had shrimp that were dieing due to molting problems then I would use it, but it's not a problem in my tanks or for the few types of shrimp that I have kept.

The fertilizer statement is not your fault but some crazy information floating around out there on the www. There's a lot of bad info out there but you're asking here will help you straighten it all out.

If RTR says there is no iodide in ferts then we'll just believe him and you don't have to worry about it being in your ferts and possibly hurting your shrimp. < So one problem solved.

It's iodide not iodine. I to have been guilty of typing in iodine....you're not alone in that misspelling/thought. < Another problem solved.

Are you having shrimp die due to molting problems?

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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2008, 10:39:31 PM »

There is no iodide in the brand of fertilizers & supplements that I use, but I have not researched the other brands. 
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TTran
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2008, 06:08:01 PM »

Thanks for setting me straight, guys  jolly1  I lost one ghost shrimp after it molted but I wasn't sure if it was just vulnerable to other fish because the exoskeleton was new. Although, a few days ago I lost two more at the same time. Interestingly, they differed from the first one in that they were pink post-partem. Did I cook them??? I had bought a new plant that day and was decontaminating it in 5% bleach, followed by a thorough rince in declorinated water. I'm not sure if I introduced chemicals into the tank...somehow I have a feeling that I blundered with the plant protocol....

In my defence, the other fish and shrimp did not die  happy
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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2008, 11:17:34 PM »

Some shrimp go opaque white (as do many of the see-through fish), but a lot of shrimp also go pink post-mortem. Nope, you did not cook the shrimp, they just look like you did.

If your water is less than at least moderately hard and alkaline, some species of shrimp may be affected by mineral lack which can also contribute to molt problems.

None of the iodide and FW shrimp business is carved in stone. It is still argued and debated and likely will be for some time.  The levels of iodide needed are tiny and we really cannot test for it realistically.  If you have molt issue and supplementing iodide helps, then pragmatically it works for you - which what I feel about it.  I have real issues with the giant Macrobrachium shrimp without it and none with.  I have poor results with Snowballs without it and much better with.  That is enough to make it useful for me, so I use it.  Most shrimp I keep (Amano, red-claw, red cherry, red-nose) I do not have any problems with no iodide supplement. 
« Last Edit: April 27, 2008, 11:26:19 PM by RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie » Logged

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