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Author Topic: A Pictus Catfish with a GloFish?  (Read 6078 times)
KelseyH
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« on: July 10, 2008, 12:11:08 AM »

Would a Pictus Catfish be okay to live in a small tank with a flourescent Glofish? My Pictus is about 1 and 1/2 inches long. The GloFish is about 1 inch.

Thanks.
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Debra
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« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2008, 12:28:25 AM »

Welcome to Badmans! happy

How big is your small tank?

Glofish (danio) are schooling fish (minimum of 6) and need alot of room to swim. They need a long tank as they enjoy zipping around the tank constantly.


Pimelodus pictus
 
 
Overview:
One of the most active fish I have seen the Pictus cat needs a large tank as it can suffer from lack of exercise In smaller aquariums.
Quick stats:   

Listed tank sizes are the minimum 
Size: up to 5" (12cm)
Tank: 48 inches 
Strata: Bottom-middle
PH: 6.5 to 7.5
Hardness: Soft to hard. dH range: 2.0 - 15.0
Temperature: 73F to 82F (23-26C)

Classification:

Order: Siluriformes
Family: Pimelodidae
Genera: Pimelodus
Species:  Pictus 

 
Typical habitat
 


 

Common name:


Pictus cat, Pimelodella, Pim

Image gallery:

Additional species photographs
Discuss:

Badmans' Forum
Distribution

South America, The Amazon and Orinoco river basins.

General Body Form:
An elongated catfish that has long barbels extending from the mouth. It has a large head and a wide mouth.


Coloration:
The basic body color is sliver spattered with many black spots. These spots are also seen on the transparent fins. The three pairs of barbels that extend from the mouth area are white.


Maintenance:
The tank should be fairly large as the Pictus is an active swimmer and needs plenty of open spaces. Although a 36 inch may suffice I believe the standard 48 inch, 55 gallon would be better. Generally an easy to care for fish the Pictus cat should present few problems. Preferring to be kept in schools when young, they tend to form smaller groups when mature. When kept in small groups this nocturnal fish will be seen out and around more often during the daylight hours. Feeding is not an issue as the pictus will accept all types of food, being an insect eater it is beneficial to feed live food on occasion and frozen bloodworms or brine shrimp when live is not available. The tank should be planted toward the rear and include large areas of open space for swimming as well as areas for hiding such as caves, driftwood and roots. The substrate should mimic its home and consist of fine sand or gravel. Clean, soft and slightly acidic water with strong filtration and a good current is ideal. They are great tankmates for the larger community cichlid aquarium, smaller species such as neons will be eaten. A note of caution, the spines are very sharp and can cause injury to you and the fish if mishandled. It is better not to use a net but rather some sort of plastic container (or bag, watch for leaks) when buying or moving this fish.

photo courtesy of Aqualand pets plus
 
The spikes are very sharp!

 



Biotope:
Found swimming above all types of bottom substrates: muddy, sandy and even small pebbles of shallow small tributaries of its home range.



Breeding:

Unknown, may be do to not reaching sufficient size or sexual maturity in the home aquarium. It is thought that the females are larger and more plump than the males.



 

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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2008, 12:36:40 AM »

Pictus are hungry.  If it can fit in their mouth, it will.  If it is edible, they will eat eat it.  Danios are edible.

Not a good idea, regardless of tank size.  All IMHO &IME.
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KelseyH
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« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2008, 12:38:49 AM »

my tank fits one gallon of water. it is 10''L x 7''W x 10''H.
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KelseyH
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« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2008, 12:41:48 AM »

I have had the pictus catfish and the glofish in the tank for four hours. the pictus does not seem aggressive toward the glofish. in fact, they seem to stay away from each other. maybe it depends on the personality of the pictus? And if the pictus is aggressive toward smaller fish then he shouldn't be in the same tank as the smaller one?
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Debra
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« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2008, 12:44:24 AM »

A one gallon aquarium doesn't really make a good home for any fish. It's just too small. I'm not certain what such small tanks are suppose to be for.

Perhaps you could buy a larger tank and keep your Glofish and add more of them to create a proper school.

HTH
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VĭиŏиMăĭ₣
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« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2008, 12:55:43 AM »

maybe it depends on the personality of the pictus?

Fish act instinctually. It is their nature to eat. Pictus eat other fish. It is natural.

Your glofish would be better with a few other glofish. You could fit them into a 10 gallon fish tank.

Perhaps you could put some flowers in your one gallon container.
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« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2008, 09:34:24 AM »

I have had the pictus catfish and the glofish in the tank for four hours. the pictus does not seem aggressive toward the glofish.

the pictus is young, wait till he matures and he will dine on the glofish.

that is assuming you get a bigger tank, cause, well the pictus will stunt, then die in the 1 gal. . . and the glofish too i bet, i would not even keep a betta in that size tank

 11574
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KelseyH
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« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2008, 11:08:27 AM »

how long is a fully grown pictus when it is not stunted? i don't exactly want a huge fish. Do you think I should keep the small GloFish in the small 1 gal. tank and move the pictus to a bigger tank with a few other fish (such as goldfish)?
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Zach
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« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2008, 11:22:51 AM »

welcome

pictus are certainly not small fish, they get about 5 inches and need at least a 4 ft long tank.
a 1 gallon is unsuitable for fish. a 10 gallon is pretty cheap and you could keep several glow-fish in there.
a 55 gallon long would be enough for a pictus.

you should rehome those fish you have ASAP if you don't want them to stunt.
as for the remaining 1 gallon, I like the suggestion of the makeshift flowerpot.
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KelseyH
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« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2008, 11:26:32 AM »

i wouldn't mind if the pictus didn't get any bigger. is stunting its growth harmful and does it shorten their life? because i wouldn't want to do that.

sorry - i have a lot of questions. i'm new to this fish equarium thing, and the Walmart people didn't say that it was bad to keep them together.
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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2008, 12:26:00 PM »

It would be comparable with you living in a cabinet under the kitchen counter.  It cannot swim or grow or move.  Rehome the fish.
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samericancichlidgirl
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« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2008, 01:28:08 PM »

Stunting causes painful organ compression, spinal deformations, a plethora of health issues, and eventually death. As RTR said...you need to rehome the catfish for sure, and you need to get your glofish at least a ten gallon tank.
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Corwin
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« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2008, 06:05:49 PM »

i wouldn't mind if the pictus didn't get any bigger. is stunting its growth harmful and does it shorten their life? because i wouldn't want to do that.

sorry - i have a lot of questions. i'm new to this fish equarium thing, and the Walmart people didn't say that it was bad to keep them together.

to the first question as rtr and SACGirl said, YES! drastically at that!

now, you will find as the more you get into this hobby, chain store (and walmart) pet employees don't know how to find their own back-ends, much less tell you what is appropriate for fish. dont Ever trust anythign they say imo. . . i mean ive seen these people sell fish that get 18+ inches to customers who were buying a 10 gallon starter tank, telling them they would be fine forever. . .petco, petsmart, petland, etc etc are usually all as bad, though sometimes you get lucky and the employee may knw what hes talking about

i suggest you look in your area for a small local fish store (LFS), mom and pops or something, it might not be better, but usually they are. until you know who/where you can trust i suggest coming back here and checking what you are told, if it matches up more often then not, you know you've found a worthy lfs. the people here have some of the best advice/experience to share  ^ ^

since you are starting out in fish-keeping, i suggest you read this awesome artile by our very own apryl ^ ^ it covers a lot of the great basics, feel free to come back here and ask for any clarification!
http://www.badmanstropicalfish.com/articles/article34.html

oh and, Welcome to badmans :P
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40 Gallon:
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1.1 Cornsnakes | 0.1 Ball Python | 1.0 Red-Tail Boa

2 Cats

2 Dog
Santafebites
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« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2008, 07:41:21 PM »

Glad I read this. nerd.Pictus is a deceptive name, it makes them sound dainty.
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KelseyH
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« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2008, 12:00:14 AM »

okay guys. i didn't move the pictus cat soon enough. not even 24 hours after i got the two fish, the cat ate my glofish. it was very gross. the cat wasn't even mature yet. i got rid of the cat and i'm done with mixing fish now - i'm not taking any chances. i got a hexagon-shaped 5 gallon tank and a small goldfish and an algae-eater. i will probably get another goldfish sometime. all is well with the fish now.
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Danni
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« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2008, 12:12:23 AM »

I haven't read the whole thread but a 5 gallon tank is way too small for a goldfish and an algea-eater. You need at least 30 gallons for one goldfish and more for 2 and your algea-eater. Please search for stunting to understand what it is and what is does.
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Corwin
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« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2008, 02:00:18 AM »

yikes kelsey,

i am sorry to bear bad news, but all goldfish get at least 8" long (some get over 1 ft), not only that but they are cold water fish, and cant live in the same temperature ranges as tropical fish (your algae eater), as danni said a single goldfish needs at least 30 gallons of water, mostly because they are super messy fish

about the algae eater, i know of only 2 commonly found species to stay small enough for a 5 gallon. Otocinclus and Corydoras, both however are shaoling fish and need to be kept in schools, and therefore a 5 gal is too small for any algae eater commonly found
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40 Gallon:
Hi-Tech Planted Tank

1.1 Cornsnakes | 0.1 Ball Python | 1.0 Red-Tail Boa

2 Cats

2 Dog
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