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Author Topic: big time algae in frog tank  (Read 10480 times)
hurschel
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« on: September 01, 2008, 07:23:14 PM »

I have a 10 gall tank with four African Dwarf frogs (no fish). I've had two of the frogs for three years and the other two for a year. We feed the tank half a bloodworm cube every three or four days.

The tank is absolutely ripe with thick green algae, and though we do regular water and filter changes and vacumn the tank, it just grows and grows.

One, do the frogs perhaps "thrive" in this environment?
Two, I have a whisper filter---is that not a strong enough filter system for the frogs' biodump?
Three, is algae the product, perhaps, of too much or not enough light?

Any other suggestions? I searched archives for this particular combo (ADFs and algae) but didn't come up with any hits.
thanks for your help!

Frog Lover
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Santafebites
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« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2008, 07:45:36 PM »

HI,

I don't know anything about frogs, but I do know one thing, where there is light there is algae. Unless you have good light. And that is another subject entirely. But where sun comes in one of my windows and shines on my tank there is algae. I used to have a cheapy hood light on my ten gal and it was covered with algae, I took out the light, and am waiting to get a new "better" light and the algae is subsiding. JUst my  11574 I'm sure there are other causes of algae, but light does affect algae.
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darkangelchrisandra
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« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2008, 08:08:11 PM »

you don't want to change the filters at all, rinse it out in dirty tank water but no changys. you are sending your tank into a cycle all over again when you do that. also algae is a product of to much light. but it doesn't harm your tank except the look
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Santafebites
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« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2008, 08:29:19 PM »

Yeah, that's what I was thinking, green algae and brown (diatoms) are harmless for the most part. Just annoying, in the tank you can scrape it off with a razor blade, being sure to avoid the silicon corners or scrub decor. Soak it in about 1tsp. peroxide and a cple cups water.  I'm sure some is worse than others like hair algae and BBA, what does yours look like?

Good catch DAC, I didn't notice the part about changing filter cartridges, what she said, you can use the same filter cartridge over and over, until it can't be cleaned anymore.
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Markalot
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« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2008, 09:41:15 PM »

Howdy,

I'm going to make some guesses here.

First off the fact that you have two, three year old frogs tells me your maintenance can't be that bad.  If you where cycling the tank every filter change I think you would have dead frogs.  Generally there is no need to change the filter pad, just rinse it in old tank water or de-chlorinated water.  If you've got a special biological pad on that whisper filter, a black sponge like thing, then that's probably where most of your bacteria lives anyway.  If you like changing your filter pad then by all means keep changing it, just be aware of the risks.

Algae is an opportunist; it fills a vacuum.  Is your tank planted with any live plants?  If not get yourself some plants (but that's for another thread).   Smiley  Nutrients build up in your water between water changes and nutrients plus light = algae.  Algae is not harmful, as long as it's not blue-green slime.  What does your algae look like?

Green, grey, hairy, long, black brush like, etc.   In the end, regardless of type, manual removal is probably your best bet.
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Santafebites
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« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2008, 10:05:39 PM »

I just re-read and he says it's thick green algae, my bad.  :)So, all of the above applies and the consensus is that your whisper filter is fine. I noticed recently that they changed their new filters, so I wonder if the cartridges will change. I have three whisper filters ATM, I wouldn't mind some different ones, but when you have a bunch of parts laying around, cause you stuck with the same brand it comes in handy.
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hurschel
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« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2008, 10:20:23 PM »

hi--tried to post again and it didn't show. the algae is dark green, like a thick blanket on the floor and walls of tank.
If I just rince out my cartridges, do I clean the filter material AND the carbon, or do I replace the carbon in the filter before I put them back?
thanks for your help-
H
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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2008, 12:32:21 AM »

it is pointless to guess what will and will not help your tank without more info about the tank.

What are the readings for nitrate, GH, KH, and pH on the tank water?

Fill a shallow bowl with tap water and let it sit out overnight, then do the same tests on the aged tap water and tell us what those are.

What is the light on the tank and how many hours per day is on?

Does the tank get direct sun or strong natural light?

How much water do you change at a time? 

At what interval do you do those changes?

Do you vacuum the substrate with each water change?

With that info, we can talk about your tank.

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Debra
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« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2008, 08:51:57 AM »

You need to add some variety to your ADFs diet.

African Dwarf Frog profile - ADF

http://badmanstropicalfish.com/profiles/profile99.html 

Quote
One, do the frogs perhaps "thrive" in this environment?

A clean tank and clean water is best for your ADFs.

Quote
Two, I have a whisper filter---is that not a strong enough filter system for the frogs' biodump?

What size tank? What size filter? You clean the substrate when you perform a water change and vac the tank. As long as your filter is the appropriate size for the tank you have then there is no need to add a stronger one. ADFs do not do well in aquariums with a strong current.

HTH

 
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