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Author Topic: Ghost Shrimp???  (Read 2081 times)
John the Fisherman
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Tanks: 55g Community; 29g Green Spotted Puffer
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« on: September 24, 2008, 06:43:38 PM »

I've been doing some reading about ghost shrimp as potential food for my puffer.  I noticed they're only 33 cents each at the LFS.  I have a few questions, as even after reading I'm not sure I know much about these little guys:

1.  If I put a population of these shrimp in my community tank, will they reproduce in there?

2.  Will other fish attack and/or eat them in the community tank?

3.  What's a good population to have in a 55g tank? A dozen?  (How much waste do they produce?)

4.  Do they pose any threat to any fish, esp bottom dwellers like corys, or my puffer when he tries to eat one?

5.  Can they carry disease when fed to other fish, like feeder goldfish can?

I'll admit the first time I ever saw one of these was in the LFS the other day, so any info is apprecaited.

One downside of using them as food is that they seem so darn cute.  Not sure I'll want to sacrifice them once I get them.

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Debra
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« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2008, 10:06:12 PM »

Paleomonetes sp.
kadakensis, paludosus
 
Overview:
More than a food source the ghost shrimp are excellent scavengers and a fine addition to a small community or species aquarium.

Quick stats:

Listed tank sizes are the minimum 
Size: Maximum 1" 1/2 (3.8cm) 
Tank: Although just about any size will do, I recommend at least a 10 gallon set up.
Strata: Bottom.
PH: Not picky, 6.5-8.0 
Hardness: Soft to medium. KH 3-10
Temperature: 70F-81F (21- 27C) Low to middle 70s ideal

Classification:

Class: Crustacea 
Order: Decapoda 
Family: Palaeomonidae 
Genera: Paleomonetes 
Species: Kadakensis, Paludosus

Common name:

Ghost Shrimp, Glass Shrimp


Distribution:

North America. Southern areas where the water temperature does not fall below 50F (10C)

Coloration:
Clear, right behind the head the digestive system and organs are visible. Basic shrimp shape with antennas on head then legs and tail

Life span:
1.25 years in captivity.

Maintenance:
Relatively easy, very sensitive to ammonia. Do not keep with fish a few inches bigger unless strict herbivores. Eat vegetable tablets, shrimp pellets, live, or flake food. Unlike the Amano shrimp these are not algae eaters and need a regular diet.

Substrate:
Bare or Gravel

Tank Dcor:
Multiple hiding places with subdued lighting.

Filtration:
Quiet, low-flow filtration is best. Although great swimmers they prefer not to.

Biotope:
Stagnant pools and drainage ditches in the southern part of the continent.

Breeding:
As long as the shrimp are kept in schools of at least 6 breeding will happen without stress. Frequent water changes can also cause breeding.

 
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RTR...Grumpy Ole Fogie
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« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2008, 11:09:59 PM »

They are great puffer treats, but no crunchy enough for a staple.  Very easy to keep to keep, gut loading is simple.

Not as productive as some other shrimp if you are looking to breed for live food.  Red Cherries cannot be beaten = unbelievably productive.  Individually much smaller, but the chase for live prey is the same, and the crunch factor marginally higher.
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