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Author Topic: Stocking question  (Read 11091 times)
Ruthy
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« on: November 05, 2015, 10:17:39 AM »

Tank:
70 litre (18.5g) temperate tank.
Sand substrate (just enough to cover the bottom).
Two sponge filters.
Anubias, some java moss (to get java fern in next couple weeks).
1-2 50-60% water changes per week.
Temperature stable at 15C

Water:
0 ammonia and nitrite. 5-20 nitrate (judging from liquid test kit that says 0.. Hence larger range), pH around 6.5, soft

Fish:
20 white cloud mountain minnows. All healthy with no signs of disease and displaying to each other frequently and all immediately go to top of tank to feed when light turned on (so well trained).

Just wondering if there's any bottom feeders I could have in there? Or too stocked? I know pretty much at the limit for a beginner keeper...
I have no algae so more because I'd like another species in the tank and possibly to get any small scraps of food that drops at feeding.
Obviously I haven't an issue keeping this as a species only tank, just might be nice to have another behaviour/activity happening in tank
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BallAquatics
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« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2015, 10:39:40 AM »

If you are doing 60% water changes twice a week, I wouldn't have any problem with a small pod of cory cats in the tank.

I grow out lots of medium sized Danios in set-ups just like this with 10 to 20 Danios and 8 to 10 Corydoras aeneus.  The large water changes are a must though if you want to keep the fish in top quality condition.

Dennis
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When i read things that say that wont work....
I mostly smile and think , yeah right 
Ruthy
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« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2015, 10:48:48 AM »

The water changes vary between 50-60% but never less than 50%.
Cory cats would be quite fun to have in there I think, not sure which species would do alright with the temperature though? We haven't got any heating on in the flat yet but it's currently remaining at 15C
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Ruthy
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« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2015, 11:04:27 AM »

I would LOVE to have pygmy cories again, they are so darn cute! But not sure on the temperature..
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gunnered72
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Theres more water than air in here :P


« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2015, 12:31:56 AM »

Temperature is a little low for Corries!

Dont think there are any coldwater bottom dwellers available to be honest...

Your best bet for picking up food from the bottom is a Hillstream Loach!
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I love to hate Water Changes! :P
Ruthy
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« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2015, 04:05:55 AM »

Ah fair enough, will just have to plant it up and stick to minnows then. Thought might have been the case.
Couldn't have another hillstream, not enough flow from the sponge filter so would be cruel to keep them where they wouldn't thrive
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Gregg
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« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2016, 04:08:30 PM »

Hi!  The peppered cory, Corydoris paleatis prefers cooler water, well below 64F is OK I have read.

Gregg
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Gregg
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« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2016, 10:27:56 AM »

I may get beat up for that choice. That cory does prefer cooler water but 68F I see would the best for lows.  The bearded cory, Scleromystax barbatus would be a better cool water cory, but your tank may be too small.  I wish you luck on what you find. 

Gregg
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TwoTankAmin
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« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2016, 01:11:44 PM »

Yes, there are cool/cold water bottom dwellers. The issue is finding smaller ones. I ran a quick search on Planetcafish for cooler water cats:

" Your search was for Min temp: 14 deg_c, Max temp: 17 deg_c, Sort by species, and we are showing 27 results.
Erethistes hara (i:1)   60mm (2.4")     12.0-28.0C (53.6-82.4F)
Liobagrus formosanus (i:1) 100mm (3.9") 12.0-20.0C (53.6-68.0F)
Noturus baileyi (i:1)   73mm (2.9")     14.0-22.0C (57.2-71.6F)
Noturus gilberti (i:1)   100mm (3.9")     14.0-22.0C (57.2-71.6F)"

PC has a species search function which allows one to search by individual and multiple parameters including temp., size and pH need. http://www.planetcatfish.com/catelog/index.php
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