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Author Topic: Longevity of white clouds.  (Read 1775 times)
Gregg
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« on: February 05, 2016, 10:27:58 AM »

Hi,

I maintain 2 unheated tanks that alter the temps per season, form winter lows of 65F to summer highs I try to keep not higher than 80F.  One is a 15 long and the other is a 20 high.  I have a ph of 7.8 to 7.9 and the water form is, I believe, moderately hard. I am having trouble with fully understanding  water hardness chemistry if you have seen some other posts I've made. I recently discovered a LFS has a dKH between 8 and 9 degrees. I say this as I know it will be asked.  The other parameters have tested well and have no poor water problems. Both tanks have easy low light plants.  Now, I love white clouds, absolutely do.  I have had them with various species in the two community tanks, and find that the combo of a shoal of 8 or more with bloodfin tetras and blackskirts in my 20 has been very successful.  Never the less I do not believe I have a WC live longer than a year, when tank mates seem to live much longer lives, especially the black skirts which are now several years old and doing very well.  So how long do yours seem to live?  These are known to be so hardy, but of all the fish I've had, they seem to do well, but die before a year, or perhaps slightly longer.

Gregg
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2016, 10:53:02 AM »

The longevity of a white cloud is normally 5-7 years.  I am wondering if yours were not juveniles when you bought them?

If you are interested in the lifespans of various fish, here is a link to an article written by one of our members.   http://www.badmanstropicalfish.com/articles/lifespans-of-tropical-aquarium-fish-article99.html

Here is also a link to the profile for the white cloud.     http://www.badmanstropicalfish.com/profiles/profile46.html
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When in doubt, do a water change.
Gregg
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« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2016, 12:01:14 PM »

Thank you for the reply!

I thought just that about my white clouds, that is, that they should be lasting longer. The other fish I own live up to the expectations on the site you referred me to.  There is a chance that I am not seeing the long lived ones, but even if so I am not having a shoal lasting as long as expected.  I maintain my water changes weekly, 40-50% with a gravel vacuum as well.  The current in both tanks has places that are strong but plenty of protected areas as well.  I buy juveniles largely as that is what is offered at my LFS.  Perhaps my shoal is not large enough?  In my 15 I have had 8, in my 20 I have had 10.  I can never not have these fish but perhaps I'll save them for the larger tank, <a href="http://s1049.photobucket.com/user/lv2crp/media/001_zpsic29xofb.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1049.photobucket.com/albums/s392/lv2crp/001_zpsic29xofb.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 001_zpsic29xofb.jpg"/>[/url]
which I believe houses my fish well.  Perhaps I'll select a particular fish and see exactly how long it lives in my tanks.

Gregg
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Gregg
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« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2016, 02:03:25 PM »

Could it be they are not getting enough to eat? This is one some time ago in my 15 gallon long, next to a newly tied down java fern. <a href="http://s1049.photobucket.com/user/lv2crp/media/015_zpsh0yve6gs.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1049.photobucket.com/albums/s392/lv2crp/015_zpsh0yve6gs.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 015_zpsh0yve6gs.jpg"/>[/url]  I am very careful about not over feeding my fish but so saying, some are plump enough and they go about doing what white clouds do, magnificent displays and such. 

Gregg
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Gregg
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« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2016, 12:06:26 PM »

OK, this is my scenario with my white clouds.  First, no diseases that affect them.  They essentially will live happily for months and then an individual will be off on it's own, looking thin and lethargic, also not interested in food. The others will be fine.  Eventually this happens again.  It seems that nobody lives much longer than a year. As I said, I'm going to try to monitor an individual and see it's life's progress.  After feeding them with thawed frozen brine shrimp, they all had plenty to eat.  I still can't help but wonder if my 20 gallon tall could use a larger shoal, it currently has 7, with 4 black skirts and 5 bloodfins.  How many more would constitute over stocking in your opinion.  This is a better picture of that tank.<a href="http://s1049.photobucket.com/user/lv2crp/media/001_zpsegumnyoo.jpg.html" target="_blank"><img src="http://i1049.photobucket.com/albums/s392/lv2crp/001_zpsegumnyoo.jpg" border="0" alt=" photo 001_zpsegumnyoo.jpg"/>[/url]

Gregg
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2016, 12:28:30 PM »

Are you feeding them a variety of foods or just bbs?
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Gregg
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« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2016, 04:05:59 PM »

Hi!

I was hoping someone would ask that. I save the thawed frozen food, brine shrimp and/or blood worms as a once a week treat. Otherwise I feed tham small amounts of dried food 2X daily most often.  This includes these foods mixed and fed with a selected bit in a tiny spoon: pure vegetable flakes, Tetra Min Tropical flakes, Hikari freeze dried blood worms, Hikari freeze dried brine shrimp, and Hikari freeze dried tubifex worms puled apart from those gray cubes. Maybe once a week I'll soak a Wardley's Shrimp Pellet and and let everybody peck at it and also a part of an algae wafer soaked and sunk as well.  And still yet I may add a drop of fine crushed egg yolk for the platy babies down there, which everyone eats avidly as well.  I am very, very careful, but try to insure that all fish get something, at last once.  I do a weekly 40-50% water change and gravel cleansing/vucuum.  Oh, I also let them all peck at boiled spinach at times as well.

Gregg
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Gregg
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« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2016, 03:34:26 PM »

Well, this occurred to me as I was searching all about white clouds.  Though the consensus seems to be that they are a tough and durable species, their live span can be, by one site, "drastically shortened by extended periods of high tropical temperature." My country can have a string of 100F plus days for at, I would say,  18 days in row, and in the 90's for months on end.  Only one room, not mine, has AC and both tanks can get well above 80F for 3 months or more.  One now sits at 69-70F and the other 67-68F.  Now I can't help by wondering if my summers are a detriment to those fish.  Some of you may keep them at tropical temperatures year round.  Curious as to what someone may think of this idea.  I am soon to enlarge the shoal of 5 to 8 in my 15 gallon long and a shoal of 7 to 12 in my 20 tall as an attempt to see if more is better, all water parameters being the same.

Gregg
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2016, 04:25:37 PM »

Keeping any fish at temps higher than their normal range will shorten their lives significantly.  But, it seems to me that you don't do that,  It seems that you try to maintain them in temps that are normal for them?
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When in doubt, do a water change.
Gregg
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« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2016, 10:44:33 AM »

Thank you!

I do this with a string of very warm days: I use ice cubes made with dechlorinated water to bring it down a bit, at least some relief.  Now, the fish I keep are subtropical and I would assume that warms summer days are the norm, so maybe this is not the reason. Today I intend to increase shoal size and see if that helps.  Or, as my wife might suggest, I'm worrying too much about this, (which is my nature I suppose.) The PH is by the way 7.6.

Gregg
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