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Author Topic: How often is ok to feed frozen bloodworms?  (Read 7949 times)
cmoorewv
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« on: February 24, 2016, 11:08:41 PM »

Hi guys... (and girls)  it's been awhile, but I'm back. I currently am running an established 55 gallon tank housing 5 rosy barbs and 8 cory cats. All the fish are voracious eaters except one female rosy. She seems to have gone on a hunger strike. She's skinny and has been uninterested in flakes, pellets, wafers, or tubifex cubes. I finally thawed some bloodworms and that perked her up. How often is it OK to feed these? I don't want her starving to death.
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cmoorewv
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« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2016, 11:10:30 PM »

She does not seem to be bullied or sick, but something stressed her into not eating. Water parameters arecgood. I change about 15-20 gallons per week.
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rasaqua
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« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2016, 11:54:42 PM »

Literally answering your question, you could feed the frozen, thawed bloodworms every day. I would not feed them exclusively though. The bloodworms should/could be made part of a several x a day variety feed.

Your skinny Rosy may actually be a different matter than just getting skinny/loss of appetite from not being an aggressive eater. How old is the Rosy Barb in question and is it a male or female? How long has it been since you started noticing her changing physiology?
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gunnered72
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« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2016, 04:34:53 AM »

Twice a week max in my opinion (as part of a varied diet)

Maybe put the fish in question into a hospital tank on its own to give it some rest and if needs be maybe a medicinal treatment...
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cmoorewv
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« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2016, 07:39:29 PM »

Literally answering your question, you could feed the frozen, thawed bloodworms every day. I would not feed them exclusively though. The bloodworms should/could be made part of a several x a day variety feed.

Your skinny Rosy may actually be a different matter than just getting skinny/loss of appetite from not being an aggressive eater. How old is the Rosy Barb in question and is it a male or female? How long has it been since you started noticing her changing physiology?

It is female and I've had her a couple years. I don't think she's being out competed for food. I watch food float right past her. She just hasn't seemed interested.  Nor does she seem bullied or sick. I have only recently noticed the change in her in the past week, but it could well have been gradually happening longer. I'm hoping a few bloodworms feedings will stimulate her.
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cmoorewv
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« Reply #5 on: February 28, 2016, 08:56:13 PM »

Unfortunately I think she has a swim bladder problem. She's spending a lot of time swimming head down, without much interest in anything. I had a 20 long that I'm wishing I'd turned into a hospital tank. All the other rosy barbs and cory cats are healthy though. Haven't checked ammonia yet, but nitrates are about 20, pH 6.8, nitrites, hardness, etc are all safe according to my strips. It may just be a deformity or stress reaction.
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Ruthy
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« Reply #6 on: February 29, 2016, 02:59:58 AM »

For the swim bladder problem you could put 1-3mg/L of salt in the water to see if that helps.
Afraid can't help much with the anorexia, not sure how easy it is to force feed a rosy barb. Although as it's affecting just the one fish it may not be water quality.. She could have eaten some substrate and has a foreign body perhaps?
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rasaqua
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« Reply #7 on: March 18, 2016, 08:43:30 PM »

What has become of the Rosy Barb?
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cmoorewv
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« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2016, 10:11:28 AM »

Sorry for the long delay. The Rosy Barb died. I'm not sure exactly why. The remains fish are still healthy.
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