Badman's Tropical Fish Forum

September 22, 2017, 04:53:21 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or join our community.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length

Welcome to the forum! Whether you are an old pro or new to the hobby, feel welcome to share your knowledge and experience and to further educate yourself about this great pastime of ours.

PetSmart
News: Stay tuned for another contest starting soon. 
 
   forum   guidelines calendar Forum search help Join Login  
  Main Site site map Fish Profiles Fish Stats Articles tank log Species Gallery Photo Gallery  

Badman's Chat
Users in chat
Please upgrade your brower.
in   cm  L °F   °C   click for tank volume calculations
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: setting up mbuna tank. Questions...  (Read 1953 times)
cmoorewv
Full Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 57


« on: February 29, 2016, 08:48:39 PM »

I have a friend who no longer wants his African cichlids. That should be my first warning sign. LOL. He has a 55 gallon tank currently housing one bumblebee cichlid, one yellow lab, and one peacock looking mbuna. I plan to set up a 75 gallon tank African cichlid style for them. My question is, will these 3 fish coexist in the long run, and will I be able to add any more? I'm a newbie when it comes to these particular fish. From what I read, bumblebees can be quite aggressive, mbuna moderately so. And yellow labs seem to be the most "peaceful" of the three. I'll take any tips and advice I can get.BTW, is it general fact or a misconception that you need to change the tank decor a lot or that overstock in reduces aggression? I want to do things right the first time.
Logged
gunnered72
Full Member

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Republic of

Tanks: 240, 100, 70, 50, 30, 30, 25 Litres
Posts: 1,040


Theres more water than air in here :P


« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2016, 03:05:21 AM »

Four things are an absolute must when keeping African Cichlids....

A big ass tank! (75 Gallons is just about ok in my opinion) (Others may disagree and recommend bigger)

A high PH of about 8 (usually achieved by using crushed coral as your substrate)

Lots and lots of rock structures and lots of hiding places in between the rocks

Lots of fish (African Cichlids are generally pretty aggressive so to diffuse aggression the tanks are normally overstocked)


As regards the three fish in question I would suggest if you take them to keep them separated...They may just destroy each other....You could house them in the same smaller tank for the time being but make or buy some kind of isolation chambers or tank dividers to keep them away from each other....

When people encounter over aggression from a fish or number of fish in an African tank (this goes for other Cichlids as well, South American and Central American) they will sometimes rearrange the decor....This re-establishes territories and sometimes works to reduce the aggression of dominant fish...BUT! it doesnt always work....And it can also be an absolute pain in the ass to rearrange big rocks especially if you have your tank scaped exactly the way you like it.....

A little tip for African Cichlid tanks with lots of rock structures is to place a power head down in the corner behind the rock structure to circulate water along the back of the tank at the bottom....(This helps to avoid dead spots and stops dirt and uneaten food gathering)

« Last Edit: March 01, 2016, 03:16:53 AM by gunnered72 » Logged

I love to hate Water Changes! :P
cmoorewv
Full Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 57


« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2016, 08:20:31 AM »

After checking my messages, the three fish are actually the yellow lab, bumble bee, and an ob peacock. Not sure if that's a true mbuna. I'm reading lots of conflicting info on the bumblebee too regarding their suitability for a cichlid community. Apparently all three have been coexisting thus far. I'm trying to get pictures of the tank in question so I can see how they have it set up. Good point on the powerheads. I don't have any yet but plan on getting a couple. Three free fish are beginning to get expensive!
Logged
russ
Whoa. Where did I put all my stuff?
Administrator
Obsessed Member

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
United States United States

Posts: 12,557


I know where rasaqua's stuff is.....


« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2016, 08:35:58 AM »

Gunnered is right about the rockworks that may be needed for an Mbuna tank. After all, 'Mbuna' means "Rockfish". There are plenty of variables to keeping Rift Lake cichlids. I personally do not believe in keeping them in an overstocked or over crowded situation to spread any aggression though. I have kept and bred several dozen different African cichlids and had several display tanks of them set up in my shops. Keeping all males, but not congeneric, or similar color pattern is one of the keys. Throw in a single female in the bunch and all hell will likely brake loose.
Logged

"For every difficult question, there is an answer that is clear and simple and wrong."
(George Bernard Shaw)
cmoorewv
Full Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 57


« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2016, 08:57:46 AM »

I do believe they are all males.
Logged
cmoorewv
Full Member

Offline Offline

Posts: 57


« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2016, 08:25:00 PM »

This African tank is turning really frustrating, fast. I've accumulated the stuff necessary to set it up but I keep getting the wrong freaking silicone. I have all these great rocks and gravel. The writing on the tu e is so small, I don't realize it's silicone 2 til I smell it. I'm going to have to pay for aquarium silicone and epoxy I guess. I hate set backs. I've been trying to get it together for weeks. Ugh!!!
Logged
russ
Whoa. Where did I put all my stuff?
Administrator
Obsessed Member

Offline Offline

Gender: Male
United States United States

Posts: 12,557


I know where rasaqua's stuff is.....


« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2016, 08:13:12 PM »

I've tried many different methods of keeping rock piles stable and together. For larger projects, the very best way to connect large piece of rockwork together is by first drilling a 5/16th hole all the way through. Then using 1/4th inch CPVC  that will thread through the opening(s) in the rock. Then I would use AquaStick by Two Little Fishes or Hold fast, by Instant Ocean to fill the top hole. These are aquarium-safe putty-like epoxy. It can also be applied underwater.

I had originally tried silicone a long time ago and it didn't last. It took too long to cure, ws difficult to keep rock piles stabilized while curing and the visible areas around the connections was not aesthetically settling to look at.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41y6LgscfEL._SX425_.jpg
Logged

"For every difficult question, there is an answer that is clear and simple and wrong."
(George Bernard Shaw)
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Badman's Recommended Links
1 Post
1 Topic
Last post by Badman
in Sites We Support
on 5/2/07 12:00 PM

 

Navigation
Badman's

Main Site Navigation

Complete Map

 

 

 

Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.028 seconds with 18 queries.