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Author Topic: Eheim Canister question  (Read 1743 times)
Tara7
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« on: March 15, 2016, 11:20:18 AM »

Hello all fish lovers,
I changed from HOB to Eheim canister filter 2217 2 months ago and am wondering how often I should clean the system and which filters I should replace? Very grateful for any advice/experience, thanks  happy
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russ
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« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2016, 10:52:55 PM »

From what I can remember, that should be the same as a Classic 600? Depending on your bio load and maintenance, 2 months should be about reaching my recommended max on your mechanical media. The ceramic noodles should be ok for another month or two. Again...depending on the bio load and maintenance of your tank. If you discover that your mechanical media is starting to get real gunky when you check it, then I would also recommend rinsing the ceramic noodles in clean, dechlorinated water. If not, then those can stay in the filter compartment longer. I've know several aquarists that don't even bother with the bio media for 5-6 months. Now there is a caveat to that. I'll explain below:

Your mechanical media is designed to trap tiny, small and large particles in the water column before they decompose inside your tank and contribute to the nitrogen compounds. They also should be placed in the water flow of your filter 'before' your bio media. This is so  particles can be captured first and not impact the bio colony. So if one allows the mechanical media to become clogged, water will 'channel' around the clogged sections and make their way into the bio media. See where Im' going with this? Mechanical media should be checked and changed much more often than bio media.

How often to change the mechanical media is all relative. Less often when properly maintaining the tank and water changes; more if your tank is not. If I was in your current position and questioning  how often to change media that has been in operation for two months, I would check it and the bio media, then do a mechanical media rinse just in case. You don't have to worry about tap water when cleaning the mechanical pad(s). Just make sure they are fairly dried out when replacing. A few swipes in mid air over the sink should also be fine.

Hoped that helped  happy


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mchambers
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« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2016, 12:23:36 PM »

I basically agree with Russ's wise advice.  In my experience with a 2217, I find that I only need to clean it about once every three months, if that.  I've never seen the flow drop, but I use prefilters on my canisters, which reduces the build up internally.

I don't bother with fine filter pads anymore, and just use Poret foam and some biomedia. 

I should warn you that there are those who say that an uncleaned canister will become a "nitrate factory".  I don't think that's true, and if you keep up with weekly water changes, you'll be removing the nitrates, which are water soluble. 
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Tara7
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« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2016, 11:06:51 PM »

Thank you both for your experience and advice. I had also heard that one only needed to 'clean it about once every three months, if that'.Also very interested about your filter options. Actually I do water changes twice a week and at the moment the water flow still seems very good. All my parameters are 0. The only concern is my pH which is high 7.4 to 7.6 but always consistent. I am starting on a discus adventure soon, so I do want the water to be as good as possible. The pH is high for discus (I'm told) and I don't want to start fooling around with it so I'm really hoping they can adapt. It is a planted tank.
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TwoTankAmin
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« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2016, 08:43:56 AM »

Poret foam is a bio-media. It is also superior the the Eheim noodles or Substrat. I set up my 3rd Eheim Pro II recently and it contains 100% Poret. This was done on the advice of Dr. Tanner of Swiss Tropicals.

I have one more Eheim I will be setting up. It is the larger 3 basket model of the pro II. In the one above it is filled all 20 ppi, the 3 basket model will have 10 ppi in the first basket and thn 20 ppi in the other two.

I clean my canisters twice a year.

Here is  a very relevant quote from Dr. Tanner:
Quote
What does that mean for aquarium biofiltration?

Water filtration is teamwork by the members of the substrate microbial community from all domains of life. This is an important conclusion, both for freshwater and marine habitats. The different players form a food web, where most organisms cannot exist alone but are interdependent. The microbial community varies greatly depending on the availability of foods, pore sizes, and substrates. Soil biofiltration is therefore very plastic, meaning it can cope with a variety of conditions. However, one feature is common. Natural layers of biofiltration are usually undisturbed for longer periods of time (many weeks and months). In nature, no one squeezes out the debris or rinses the media on a weekly schedule. Occasionally, seasonal floods or rains may “wash” a gravel bed but regular rinsing of the filter media is not happening. The microorganisms eat the debris and the sludge is completely broken down into gases and soluble products that then escape the pore space. Soil biofilters are almost maintenance-free. The released substances are either getting into the atmosphere or are taken up by plants.

For aquarium biofiltration to be most effective, filters should be running undisturbed for as long as possible. Filter media that remain passable and have a variety of pore sizes are best. Given that we like to influence the water parameters depending on the species we keep, and thus make water soft, hard, etc, the filter media should be chemically inert, so that it does not affect the water chemistry by itself.
from http://www.swisstropicals.com/library/aquarium-biofiltration/

When I first began using Hamburg Matten filters and the filtration in a tank was a single large Poret foam and nothing else I was worried about water clarity. That worry was quickly removed as the tank water is as clear or clearer as it was when I used more traditional filters with some floss in them. The best part of Mattens, and what drew me to them, is they only require cleaning once every year or two. I also find I only need to clean the Poret cubes (which replaced many of my sponge filters) about every 3 to 4 weeks.
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russ
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« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2016, 07:14:16 PM »

"Filter media that remain passable"

Yeppers!
 Been touting that since I joined the site. I've always contended that a thriving bacteria colony needs three main things to sustain:

1. Water flow
2. Food source
3. Method of transporting/converting it's waste product

I think Dr. Tanner was also hinting at the mineralization process that also take place.
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"For every difficult question, there is an answer that is clear and simple and wrong."
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Tara7
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« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2016, 08:49:29 PM »

Thank you so much! This information is invaluable and I'm sure will help others. I will keep it preciously for future use.God bless!  proud
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