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Author Topic: Best kind of shrimp  (Read 2212 times)
azbev
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« on: April 16, 2016, 04:25:40 PM »

I have a 20-gallon fresh, fully cycled, with 1 DG, 7 Neon Tetras, 6 False Julii Corycats + one baby that just showed up!  I am curious to know about shrimp.  I can read articles online, but would prefer a few ideas from experienced hobbyists.  I know that anything I add will add to bioload; however, I believe I have room for two or three.  Questions:  What are the odds of introducing unwanted bacteria, disease and such?  Will they be a snack for my Gourami (who so far has not touched any fry in the tank in 9 months)?  What variety shrimp is best and why?   My most curious question is WHY have shrimp at all?  Do they serve a valuable purpose (other than eating leftovers on the bottom) or are they simply fun to watch?   Thank you very much for your comments.
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azbev
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« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2016, 04:51:55 PM »

I've just read articles recommended by Pat Mary and others.  Now I see that Mr. Gourami may be a problem (although his history is NOT eating fry plus he's only about 2" with a relatively small mouth*) and even the Corycats and the tetras (but I don't see how as these are Neons with small mouths).   *However, I read that a shrimp may be "nipped to death" and then eaten, so that sounds horrible.

I am still interested in any applicable answers to my other questions and any additional information folks with experience may have.  Thank you.
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mchambers
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« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2016, 07:09:15 PM »

I think Mr. Gourami will think your shrimp are sushi. 

But shrimp are nice to have, because they're fun to watch and they don't add much bioload.  I have red cherry shrimp in about half of my tanks, and crystal black and crystal red shrimp in a couple of tanks.  But any fish over 3" long is likely to want to eat shrimp.
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TwoTankAmin
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« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2016, 10:03:46 AM »

Shrimp can be a neat addition to a tank. However, the problems involved can be either that small shrimp are food for other tank inhabitants or else other small inhabitants are food for the shrimp. I have a 50 gal. tank loaded with amano shrimp which are champion algae eaters. But they will also eat eggs, fry and smaller fish if they can. I do not use them in breeder tanks. On the other hand trying to put them into my 150 gal with big clown loaches would be silly as all the shrimp would be is expensive snacks. I can tell you 100% that adult amano shrimp will eat bn fry.

Not all shrimp are algae eaters, some are filter feeders and others may not eat algae. My experience has been shrimp are best suited to either planted tanks or also nano tanks. My red cherry shrimp have been self sustaining in a 5.5 gal. now for about 4 years maybe 5. They only get very tiny (nano) fish as tankmates.
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“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.” Daniel Patrick Moynihan
"The good thing about science is that it’s true whether or not you believe in it." Neil DeGrasse Tyson
azbev
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« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2016, 10:51:28 AM »

Thank you mcchambers and TwoTankAmin.   I have a lot more research to do before adding shrimp, I can see that -- and I had no idea they are so expensive!  One thing I still do wonder about is this:  do shrimp pose any risk to adding bacteria or diseases of any kind to a tank?  Also, apparently shrimp mate like crazy, and I assume that can be a problem, unless one wants feeder shrimp?

I am so pleased with the condition of my tank - finally - crystal clear and no problems that I am aware of (plus the baby False Julii Corycat -a thrill for me since I gave no special spawning preparation whatsoever.)  Anyway, the tank:  I am just so hesitant to take the risk of adding any problems whether it's new plants, new fish, snails or shrimp.    (Love those African Dwarf frogs, too!)   Thank you again for your consideration and comments.
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mchambers
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« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2016, 11:05:56 AM »

I'm not aware of shrimp posing any risk as to carrying diseases.  I suppose it is possible, but I've never experienced it or read about it.

The prolific breeding isn't really a problem, in my experience.  Having lots of shrimp is a good thing.  I belong to two local aquarium clubs, and often put a bag or two of red cherry shrimp in the meeting auctions.

Shrimp can be expensive, yes.  I've got some crystal black and red shrimp that typically go for about $5 in auctions.  Your best best might be craigslist.  There are lots of shrimp on aquabid, too, but then you'll have to pay for shipping. 
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