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Author Topic: My betta was accidentally wounded, what should I do  (Read 2445 times)
Varden Lu
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« on: April 23, 2016, 05:56:47 AM »

I was cleaning the substrate with a tube, then my betta swam by very close, immediately sucked into the tube and all the way down into the bucket. It lost some scales on the right side of the body and had its reddish white flesh exposed, as seen in the picture. It's calm for the moment.

Will it survive ? What should i do to help it recover? Will the scales grow back and make it nice-looking again like what it was before? There's another picture taken before the accident.

I just bought it a few days ago for about one U.S dollar in a local supermarket.I also thought of replacing it with a new one but wasn't sure, since I feel so sorry for this poor fish. What's your suggestion?
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2016, 08:23:39 AM »

I would treat the fish with Melafix to prevent infection and keep the water as clean as possible by doing large water changes.

By the way, welcome to Badman's!  Smiley
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When in doubt, do a water change.
Varden Lu
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« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2016, 10:45:55 AM »

I would treat the fish with Melafix to prevent infection and keep the water as clean as possible by doing large water changes.

By the way, welcome to Badman's!  Smiley

Thanks so much Pat Mary.

BTW I wasn't able to post photos of my fish cause my posts less than ten. Sorry about that.The fish was a blue handsome guy with purplish hue on its ventral and caudal fins.
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Varden Lu
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« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2016, 11:56:03 AM »

Here comes my fish photos, before and after it's hurt.



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Pat Mary
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« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2016, 01:13:49 PM »

He's a beautiful fish.
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Gregg
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http://i1049.photobucket.com/albums/s392/lv2crp/Ca


« Reply #5 on: May 01, 2016, 09:15:14 AM »

One of my other passions is fly fishing. I have caught trout stabbed by herons, whitefish dropped by bald eagles, all species mangled by mink and otters, in addition to unknown wounds and obvious birth defects. One son rescued a stranded 5lb bass stabbed 5 times by a heron, it swam away fine, which does not mean it lived.  The others were feeding despite in all, that's how I know. But most were cold water fish with less of a bacterial count, I was told by a biologist I called about one fish, and he seemed to think they all would survive.  Now, being in an enclosed environment things change. I've done that to much smaller fish while cleaning, one I had to blow out the tube, but it was fine. Check this carp (they take flies and fight hard), obvious birth defect, but it swam away vigorously.http://i1049.photobucket.com/albums/s392/lv2crp/015_zpsmmobugst.jpg

Gregg
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Varden Lu
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« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2016, 10:29:14 AM »

Thanks Gregg.

I treated my betta with antibacterial fish drug, a local brand, not Melafix because local shops don't have this. The betta is still alive and seems to recover a bit, though it looks much thinner than before.But I think it will be fine because it's now on a normal and regular diet.
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2016, 10:37:33 AM »

I would be apprehensive about the state of the bacteria in your filter because of using an antibacterial medication.  I know that Melafix is also antibacterial but it does not affect the filter.  But. not all meds are good for the filter.  Watch your betta carefully for any sign of either ammonia or nitrite poisoning.
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Varden Lu
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« Reply #8 on: May 01, 2016, 11:46:19 AM »

I'm afraid you were just right, Pat Mary. I tested my water upon reading your reply, Ammonia N level was 0.10mg/L or less, but Nitrite Nitrogen reading was well beyond 0.30mg/L, which was the highest level my testing kit can measure,as shown in the below picture.

A 75% water change was immediately performed but I'm afraid the whole cycle system in my tank has now been ruined. I might as well guess there's not even an established cycle in there because the tank was set up only 20+ days ago.

[img=http://www.dumpt.com/img/files/jzvdkks8xisadj6a47xy_thumb.jpg]
« Last Edit: May 01, 2016, 11:51:45 AM by Varden Lu » Logged

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Pat Mary
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« Reply #9 on: May 01, 2016, 12:23:09 PM »

I'm sorry to hear that.  Sad

Are you able to get some media from someone who has an established tank?  Or, is any "bacteria in a bottle"  available in China or maybe Hong Kong?   If not, keep doing large water changes to keep ammonia and nitrite down while a new colony is being formed.  Keep us posted. 
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Varden Lu
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« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2016, 07:04:47 AM »

The nitrite level was still two high after two large water changes, so I replaced the betta into a glass container with new water (first picture below,the water is blueish because of the fish drug  I added).

To help build a cycle, I added concentrated nitrifying bacteria into the tank, along with half a dozen gold zebra danios (second picture), which are very bright, lively and extremely affordable at the same time - they cost me no more than half a U.S dollar.

BTW I live in mainland China, 120 kilometres northwest of Hong Kong.



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Pat Mary
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« Reply #11 on: May 03, 2016, 08:41:08 AM »

Your betta still needs to be monitored for ammonia and nitrite especially because you didn't mention a filter for that glass container. 

I know that Guangdong is in mainland China but it looked much closer to Hong Kong than 130 kilometers on a map to me.   Sorry about that   Smiley
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bettagirl25
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« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2016, 06:27:37 AM »

Small QT tank and now this was from my own personal beta experience but just a teeny pinch of aquarium salt.Like powder it up really really fine.Same with some fish flakes.Long story short poor David was swimming in my 55 gal bow tank and ran afoul of my convict cichlid.I literally found David just in time for him into a QT tank and did the aquarium salt with twice daily changes of water and also stress coat.Poor dude was almost dead but he made it...

Only for the cat to get him later ugh.

Never trust those Berta falls kits they are horrible!By QT tank one of the ones with a secure locking lid to it is best.
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TwoTankAmin
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« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2016, 09:57:14 AM »

Just an FYI for future reference re nitrite.

SOME FACTS ABOUT NITRITE
 
This too is a problem and it is important to understand how it affects fish in order to know how you can deal with it.
 
“Nitrite enters the bloodstream through the gills and turns the blood to a chocolate-brown color. Hemoglobin, which transports oxygen in the blood, combines with nitrite to form methemoglobin, which is incapable of oxygen transport. Brown blood cannot carry sufficient amounts of oxygen, and affected fish can suffocate despite adequate oxygen concentration in the water. This accounts for the gasping behavior often observed in fish with brown blood disease, even when oxygen levels are relatively high.”
from https://srac.tamu.edu/serveFactSheet/110

SIGNS OF NITRITE POISONING
Fish will not behave as they normally do. Because their blood is not carrying oxygen, fish will behave as if they are suffocating. They may hang just below the water surface or near filter outflows trying to get air. What you will not see is any outward sign of bodily damage nor damage to the gills of the fish.

HOW TO MANAGE NITRITE POISONING
 
Fortunately, there is an effective way to blunt the harmful effects of elevated nitrite that doesn’t involve changing lots of water- you add salt (sodium chloride) to the water. The chloride in the salt acts to” block” the ability of nitrite to enter though the gills of the fish and thus to cause the harm inside the fish it might. So it is possible to manage elevated nitrite over the short term using salt in relatively small amounts.
 
“Sodium chloride (common salt, NaCl) is used to “treat” brown blood disease. Calcium chloride can also be used but is typically more expensive. The chloride portion of salt competes with nitrite for absorption through the gills. Maintaining at least a 10 to 1 ratio of chloride to nitrite in a pond effectively prevents nitrite from entering catfish.” from https://srac.tamu.edu/serveFactSheet/110

 
It should be noted that the Merck Veterinary manual suggests a lower ratio of chloride:
 
“In freshwater production ponds for channel catfish, a ratio of 6 parts Cl to 1 part NO2 has effectively prevented or treated methemoglobinemia caused by nitrite exposure.”
from http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/exotic_and_laboratory_animals/aquatic_systems/environmental_diseases_in_aquatic_systems.html

The above information is from one of three cycling related articles I wrote for another site-Rescuing A Fish In Cycle Gone Wild - Part Il If anybody wants the balance of the article which deals with what salt to use, how to test for nitrite levels which are higher than a test kit goes and how to calculate how much salt to add for any given number of gallons and any level of nitrite, you can PM me.
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“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.” Daniel Patrick Moynihan
bettagirl25
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« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2016, 03:31:12 AM »

Huh well I'll be buggered!Honestly when I found David I saw a trail of brown and there looked like there was a smashed powdered penny on the rock.After reading that info I am guessing he was suffering from nitrate poisoning and I likely did save him with the powdered aquarium salt!I was seriously flying by the seat of my pants as it were when that happened.Quite happy to know that considering my inexperience I did SOMETHING right in that instance.  happy
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