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Author Topic: Cyanobacteria transfer  (Read 1607 times)
fuzzycatz
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Tanks: 29g: 8 Black Neon Tetras, 7 Kuhli Loaches, 1 Dwarf Gourami, 1 Bolivian Ram, 1 amano shrimp, and a nerite snail
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« on: June 14, 2016, 11:16:57 AM »

Hi Everyone!

My 55 gal. is almost cycled (waiting for the nitrites to drop) and I'll be moving the contents of my 29 gal. to the new tank. One organism I don't want to take with me is the cyanobacteria I have been battling. Any suggestions on how I can avoid transferring it to the new tank while still keeping my driftwood and decorations from the old tank? Is there a safe way to clean it or remove it?
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2016, 02:00:31 PM »

I'm a little confused.  I didn't remember you having any blue green algae (cyanobacteria) before so I looked back and found that you did have green beard algae back in 2012.  Is that what you really meant and do you still have it after treating it?

To me, the easiest way to ensure that I don't transfer algae would be  to let the decorations sit out in the sun for a couple of days.  This would dry the algae and you could just brush the remaining dry pieces off.  Then, be sure that you are keeping your lights on for the minimum amount of time for your plants and keep your plants fertilized so that they can fight the algae. 
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When in doubt, do a water change.
fuzzycatz
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Gender: Female
Tanks: 29g: 8 Black Neon Tetras, 7 Kuhli Loaches, 1 Dwarf Gourami, 1 Bolivian Ram, 1 amano shrimp, and a nerite snail
Posts: 119



« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2016, 12:33:08 PM »

I still have it despite my repeated attempts to treat it. I'll try setting the plastic plants and driftwood in the sun. How about real plants? I notice they have a bit of it on them as well.
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2016, 01:00:57 PM »

Try to rub it off with your fingers.  In case you have forgotten how to control algae, here is a basic link to read.     http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=16+2154&aid=3416
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When in doubt, do a water change.
Pat Mary
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Gender: Female
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Posts: 8,655



« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2016, 05:08:34 PM »

You can probably never get rid of all algae.  You just have to control it.  So, if you have "a bit of algae on the leaves", that is not bad.
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When in doubt, do a water change.
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