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Author Topic: Using Well Water question  (Read 2181 times)
pokey6
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« on: June 18, 2016, 07:24:42 AM »

Hi All

A co worker of mine just moved to the country and has a 25g that she slowly changed over to well water from city water. She saved 75% of her old water and thru small water changes every other day she now has a tank of full well water.
Is there anything she has to worry about with using well water? I am not sure, but I thought I read somewhere that when using well water you don't need to use de chlorinator. Is this right? Any other concerns she might need to know?

Thanks
Paula
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2016, 08:26:52 AM »

You are right about not having to use dechlorinator.  Municipalities add chlorine and chloramines to the water but private wells don't have those added.  The only thing that I can think of that needs to be watched is a rise in nitrates.  Farmers fertilizing their fields can result in very high nitrates during certain times of the year.
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When in doubt, do a water change.
TwoTankAmin
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« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2016, 12:39:43 PM »

There can be other things in well water (I have a well). What might be in well water is primarily a function of where one lives and what is in the area. For example, if one lives in farm country then nitrate and even ammonia can be issues due to fertilization as Pat Mary noted above. If one is not far from industrial or mining or even oil/nat. gas wells, then other things may be an issue. One can have excess heavy metals in their water. These may not be in sufficient concentrations to harm humans bit may still be harmful to fish.

Some dechlors will deal with lower levels of such things. An example would be SeaChem Prime which claims "It will also detoxify any heavy metals found in the tap water at typical concentration levels."

Unlike municipal water which is required to issue annual reports on whats in the water, private well owners must pay for such testing themselves. That testing is the only way to know exactly what is in one's well water.
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“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.” Daniel Patrick Moynihan
pokey6
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« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2016, 03:44:03 PM »

Thanks Guys. I will pass this info on.

Paula
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bettagirl25
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« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2016, 10:36:50 PM »

Definitely the PH balance as well.When I moved back to the city from Up in the country I had a drastic pH shift and because I was sick I didn't figure it out right away.It cost me most of my tank with a few exceptions.I've got a pH stabilizer powder I use on the tank.Prior to the move the pH had been like 9 and there was a HUGE drop to like I think 3.Well after I had my gallbladder out I start looking further and realize this so I nabbed the powder no deaths since then thank goodness!
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fishtank
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« Reply #5 on: June 03, 2017, 05:48:50 AM »

canister filter can help to balance the pH level.
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russ
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« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2017, 06:39:49 PM »

canister filter can help to balance the pH level.


How?


* No color image.jpg (2.99 KB, 76x70 - viewed 66 times.)
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TwoTankAmin
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« Reply #7 on: June 06, 2017, 10:56:41 AM »

I agree with russ, HOW?

Balancing pH is a chemistry issue. Filters merely provide a place for the biological components of filtration to live/reside.
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“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.” Daniel Patrick Moynihan
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