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Author Topic: Cloudy tank  (Read 1014 times)
Gary F
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« on: August 08, 2016, 04:50:54 PM »
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I have just started a 65g freshwater tank Saturday.  I have not added any fish yet. I added a large airs tone last night and when I came home tonight from work my tank was cloudy. Not sure if it is because of air stone or what. Any help would be great!! Thanks
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2016, 05:20:01 PM »
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Hi, Gary F.  Do you know about the nitrogen cycle?    Here is a link about how to do it.  You will need to establish a bacteria colony before you add any fish if you are doing a fishless cycle.        http://www.badmanstropicalfish.com/forum/index.php?topic=1023.0 

Did you add any dechlorinator to the water when you filled it?  Are there any tiny bubbles in the water?  They may be the reason for your cloudiness.  Let us know what your level of knowledge is about keeping fish and we will help you.  Smiley
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When in doubt, do a water change.
Gary F
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« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2016, 05:57:33 PM »
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I had fish growing up but this is my first tank on my own. I think it's the start of a bacteria bloom. This is the first tank I have had with a HOB filter system. Growing up we had under gravel filters so I consider myself a rookie. I have a penguin 350 filter. When I added water to tank Saturday I added dechlorinator and batterie supplement to the tank. I washed gravel and plants and wood before putting in tank also. My ph is 7.4 and ammonia is at .25ppm it was at .50ppm yesterday. My nitrite is at 0ppm and my nitrate is around 5 ppm. There is some small air bubbles in tank but it actually looks like smoke in the tank.
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2016, 06:13:49 PM »
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It probably is from just adding everything to a brand new setup.  I don't know what a "batterie supplement" is so cannot comment on that.

If you read the link that I gave you. you will notice that it takes 4-6 weeks to establish a cycle unless you add media from an established tank.  Your ammonia reading indicates to me that you have ammonia in your tap water.  Normally you will get ammonia from an ammonia source such as pure ammonia or fish.  You will need to add ammonia until the cycle is established.
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When in doubt, do a water change.
Gary F
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« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2016, 06:21:14 PM »
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Meant Bacteria supplement sorry have fat fingers lol. Yeah I have read it can take anywhere from 3-6 weeks to cycle. Should I also be putting small amount of food in take to help the bacteria. I thought u want an ammonia level to be 0. Why should I be adding ammonia.
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Pat Mary
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« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2016, 09:04:17 AM »
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Meant Bacteria supplement sorry have fat fingers lol. Yeah I have read it can take anywhere from 3-6 weeks to cycle. Should I also be putting small amount of food in take to help the bacteria. I thought u want an ammonia level to be 0. Why should I be adding ammonia.

When you add a true bacteria supplement, you are jump-starting a bacteria colony.  (Not all supplements are equal so some may not work.)  I would only add fish food if I could not find any other source for the bacteria to eat.  It messes up the tank and does not do the job as fast as, or as good as, pure ammonia.

In  a nutshell. this is what happens when you cycle a tank.  You start out adding some food source that will produce ammonia.  You keep the ammonia at a certain level (see the link which I gave to you) and bacteria will appear which will eat that bacteria.  The result of them eating the ammonia will be nitrite.  After a while, other bacteria will arrive to eat the nitrites.  That process results in a waste of nitrates.  We do water changes to lower the nitrates.  A cycled tank will have readings of 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites and some level of nitrates. preferably under 20ppm. 

I did not know that you were adding a supplement so, because you had ammonia already, I thought that your tap water might have had ammonia already in it.
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When in doubt, do a water change.
TwoTankAmin
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« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2016, 10:14:14 AM »
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A few quick observations.

1. I wounder why you have an ammonia reading. The bacteria which cause a bacterial bloom are not the same ones which handle nitrification (converting ammonia to nitrate). The bloom type bacteria can double fast, the nitrifiers take 8 -12 hours in optimal conditions and longer if conditions are not optimal. The bloom bacteria can use ammonia etc.

2. Some bacterial additives which are not the ones I would recommend often contain bacteria which will cause a bloom and/orthe  nutrients in the bottle which can. I suggest using Dr. Tim's One and Only or Tetra's Safe Start (they are basically the same).

3. I know this will ruffle some feathers on the site, but I do not endorse the directions here for doing a fishless cycle. It suggests using too much ammonia and dosing it too often, imo. I have a cycling article on another site but I will not link to it as that is not right. What I can tell you is it is a variation on that suggested by Dr. Timothy Hovanec who with other researchers identified the specific strains of nitrifying bacteria in fw tanks. The problem with Dr. Tim's directions is they use the more scientific nitrogen scale to measure ammonia and nitrite and most hobby test kits use the total ion scale. My cycling article is written for use with this type of kit. (there is a formula for converting between the two scales.) Here is the link to Dr. Tim's cycling info http://www.drtimsaquatics.com/resources/fishless-cycling After reading it at the bottom you will see two links. Please click this one DrTim’s Guide to Fishless Cycling and read it as well http://www.drtimsaquatics.com/resources/how-to-start If you would like a copy of my article, you can shoot me a site PM with your email addy and I will send you a copy.

As an FYI, the very first fishless article I have located was: Originally published as: Koga, James S. Use Household Ammonia to Humanely Cycle a Tank. Freshwater and Marine Aquarium, 19, no. 4 (December 1996): 213-214. He revised it over time and lowered the ammonia amount. You can read it all here http://www.cpp.edu/~jskoga/Aquariums/Ammonia.html



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