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Author Topic: fish adding order  (Read 819 times)
kromagg
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« on: October 01, 2016, 04:34:09 PM »

So I got my list (at last)
tank is ready and cycling.. I got another week at least but I want to start plan my purchases..
SO what fish should I start with introduction to the tank? can I add all I plan for each type??
list:
honey gourami
neon tetra
guppy
german rim (2)
panda cory
bristelnose pleco (1)

can someone help me with schedule? (who first? how many at a time? how long till next lot?)

p.s. I read tetra and guppy r not best first fish
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russ
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« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2016, 07:38:28 AM »

My recommendation for the order to introduce those fish you wish to keep:

  2nd -honey gourami (2)
  1st -neon tetra (10)
  3rd -guppy (2 male only)
  6th -german rim (2)
  5th -panda cory (4)
 4th -  bristelnose pleco (1)

With that said, each group should be added within two weeks apart from next group.
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kromagg
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« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2016, 01:01:13 PM »

Thank you. Forgive my ignorance but I keep reading everywhere that tetra as first fish is the most common mistake beginners do. Apparently they to sensitive to water changes to be first fishes.. Just want to make sure it's OK. I mean it seems only obvious tetra should be first but after all this reading in getting worried...
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russ
Whoa. Where did I put all my stuff?
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I know where rasaqua's stuff is.....


« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2016, 06:53:35 AM »

When your fishless cycling break-in is done correctly, adding the Tetras first should present no issues.
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TwoTankAmin
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Tanks: 20- from 5.5 to 150 gals.
Posts: 317



« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2016, 11:04:56 AM »

A proper fishless cycle allows one to stock fully right away. This also means the tank is also the quarantine tank as all fish usually come from the same place and go in at the same time. Gradual stocking should use a quarantine tank to prevent problems down the road.

If you insist on gradual sticking them I would use biomass as the primary consideration. Put in the biggest ammonia producing fish first and work towards the the lower ammonia producers last. The next consideration for me would be temperament. I want the least aggressive fish going in first. Starting with more aggressive or territorial fish means the less aggressive fish added later will be faced with inhabitants who consider themselves the "tank boss" and such fish are more likely to attack new introductions than when one adds them in the reverse order.

There are a lot of myths out there and one is that cardinals and neon and many other tetras are not hardy. This is only true when the fish involved are farmed and/or ill cared for. Healthy stock will do just fine. Perhaps the most important challenge a fish keeper has is finding the better sources for fish. This is one aspect of the hobby where it rarely pays to try and save money. As a person who ships fish and has most new fish shipped to me, I can tell you that one live healthy fish is worth at least 3 DOAs. :-)





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“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.” Daniel Patrick Moynihan
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