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Author Topic: Can a moss ball transmit disease?  (Read 761 times)
stategirl28
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« on: October 14, 2016, 06:51:08 AM »

I had a betta for almost 2 years and a couple weeks ago he suddenly came down with dropsy and died. I treated him in his tank for 3 days before he succumbed to the illness. From what I've read I know that dropsy is more of a symptom than an actual disease. He wasn't that old so I'm thinking it was a bacterial infection.

Anyway, he had a moss ball in his tank, the only live plant I had. I'm overhauling the little 5 gal hex and I plan on fully planting it and changing to fluorescent lights and everything. Can I keep my moss ball (currently living in a cup)? Or will I risk making the new betta sick?
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gunnered72
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Theres more water than air in here :P


« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2016, 03:37:58 PM »

Betta lifespan is average 3 years either way depending on diet and water quality (Remembering aswell that they are roughly 6 months to a year old when you buy them)...In optimal conditions they can live longer but this is not the norm....

Yes plants carry nasty stuff....

I reckon old age kicked in and thats why he passed on...Dropsy was just the symptom of old age...

I reckon your moss ball is fine to reuse...But If ya wanna be really sure give it a bath in Potassium Permanganate for about an hour....That will kill all the nasties if there are any....

Before ya do though watch some you tube videos on potassium permanaganate aquatic plant baths...Its messy stuff and will stain anything it touches permanently...wear rubber gloves and be  careful...You only need a tiny amount in a container of water....

In fact for future reference....Potassium Permanagante baths for new plants are an excellent way to kill nasties that can come in on plants....
« Last Edit: October 14, 2016, 03:44:47 PM by gunnered72 » Logged

I love to hate Water Changes! :P
AnnaK
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« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2016, 09:51:21 AM »

Hi, thanks for the response. I am the original poster. Seems I had accidentally logged into a very old account (now deleted).

Where can I find potassium permanganate? Might be easier to simply buy a new moss ball if it's hard to find/more than like $5
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gunnered72
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Theres more water than air in here :P


« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2016, 12:00:14 AM »

Ebay...

Remember its very handy to have for steralizing future plant additions...

You are really taking a chance by adding new plants to a tank without treating them for nasties first...

Keeping a little container of Potassium Permanganate around is always handy for any aquarist...It does have other aquatic uses besides treating plants...Im not going to get into that here now though...
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I love to hate Water Changes! :P
TwoTankAmin
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« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2016, 04:08:48 PM »

I would not be so quick to attribute the loss and the cause to old age. What sort of diet were you feeding the fish. The most common cause of bloating in tank fish is not bacteria, it is an inappropriate diet.
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“Everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.” Daniel Patrick Moynihan
AnnaK
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« Reply #5 on: October 18, 2016, 08:08:02 PM »

I was feeding betta pellets. He never looked "bloated" per se...but when i found him on the bottom of his tank his scales were all sticking up. It came on very quickly. my pH is around 7.8 idk if that could have affected him.

i threw away the moss ball just fyi. hopefully my new plants are not carrying anything. they are in the tank with no creatures for now.
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